AT planes

I’ve been referring to AT planes as the only reliable superheavy counter. Why?

Most things that can harm a superheavy are defensive in nature. An ATGM requires the superheavy to stay spotted for a long time; this is usually the case when the tank isn’t being microed or is in the open. Infantry requires the superheavy to be encroaching on an occupied forest. Neither can be used to push – if your infantry is walking in the open to reach an enemy forest, the enemy tanks can take potshots and hide before ATGM can hit. Just as importantly, any ATGM hits that do connect will only damage, not outright kill, leaving the controlling player with a wounded but intact superheavy that he can repair after repelling your attack.

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The Mig-27 has a HEAT gun, which damages tanks if you directly target them.

An AT plane, on the other hand, can circle behind a push and dive on the first defending superheavy that appears, killing it in one pass. This isn’t a strong way to use your AT planes; it tends to get them killed, and careful micro can still hide the targeted tank in time. But in a deck without superheavies of its own, it’s usually the only way to deal with a defensive superheavy protecting lots of open ground.

AT planes, as all planes, are much better when used defensively. If you target tanks in the middle of crossing open ground and time it right, they won’t be able to reach a forest and hide from the instant death missiles. Such approaches also decrease the likelihood of losing the plane to AA. Conversely, when controlling expensive tanks, try to only cross open ground when an ASF is available to intercept airstrikes, and keep in mind how long it would take you to get to cover.

There’s not much else to say about AT planes as far as beginner tips go – expect them, bring some of your own, and don’t waste them on cheap targets because you’ll need them for the superheavies. On the other hand, not every run is a suicide mission.

To the next guide post: Recon

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